FAQ

The FAQ page is under development. Please submit your comments or questions about the story here.

CHARACTERS:

Kayla

Why…?

Annabelle

Why…?

Kahph

xxx

Pallador

xxx

Colonel Razor

xxx

Sky

Geckos don’t bite, so why does Sky?

ANSWER: Actually, many, if not most, geckos do bite. It is said that house geckos don’t bite, but they do. Still, on an alternate earth, geckos can have a surprise or two. And it isn’t stated in the story that Sky is a house gecko.

HISTORY:

First World

Why…?

Second World

Why…?

TECHNOLOGY:

Goat Eaters’ Device

Why…?

LANGUAGE:

Accents:

- Why do the characters in this alternate earth have accents resembling those of our world?

- The accents resemble well known accents, but they’re not quite consistent? Why?

ANSWER: Because, while sounding somewhat familiar, you must remember that this is an alternate universe. A number of things including accents developed here, as they did in our universe, but in not quite the same ways. (See the Memory-Alpha links below under “Hodgkin’s Law”, or “Mirror Universe”)

Vocabulary:

Luddites – Would the Vosu have a word like this in their vocabulary? Troglodytes – ”

See, Hodgkin’s Law of Parallel Planetary Development: Hodgkin’s Law

See, Mirror Universe: Mirror Universe

WRITING STYLE:

Dialog Tags: Why is it that you never use the traditional dialog tags in your writing – “he said”, “she said”?

ANSWER: Years ago, RG (one of the writers) read Tolkien’s books and Watership Down to his young sons. He loves to read out loud. He’s had a little training for putting proper sense stress, emphasis, modulation, and proper pausing into public reading, so when he read The Hobbit, or the LOR volumes, he enjoyed getting into each and every character, taking great care to make it quite clear who was speaking, and how that character was speaking.

Well, Tolkien, like so very many other writers, preferred to unquestioningly follow the traditional tagging style, “he said” “she said” – tagging the speaker after the quote.

RG says, it drove him nuts! He’d be hot and heavy into several characters’ voices and moods, only to stumble and crash when he discovered – after seeing the tag – that he had launched into the wrong voice and mood for the quote.

So, right then and there, he said he’d resolved that if ever he wrote a story with dialog, he’d never put the character tag after the quote.

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